Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that understands your business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
"We highly recommend Jerry Jones, a CPA in Reno, NV to anyone who is interested in being advised in all areas of their tax planning in an efficient and expert manner. He is a very dedicated individual who works hard for his clients, handling all of his clients personally, and follows through on every part of the tax-filing process. Jerry is extremely knowledgeable with the regulations and requirements needed to successfully calculate both personal and business taxes, and is vigilant in keeping up with the latest laws, updates, and changes. Jerry is a creative thinker who has always made himself available outside of normal business hours to answer our questions. We particularly appreciate the occasional emails he sends out apprising his clients of changes to the tax code that could affect us. If you are looking for an engaged, and thoroughly competent CPA, look no further."
Chris & Amanda Schroeder, Reno, NV

IRS warns of new phone scam using Taxpayer Advocate Service numbers

The Internal Revenue Service today warned the public about a new twist on the IRS impersonation phone scam whereby criminals fake calls from the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS), an independent organization within the IRS.

Similar to other IRS impersonation scams, thieves make unsolicited phone calls to their intended victims fraudulently claiming to be from the IRS. In this most recent scam variation, callers “spoof” the telephone number of the IRS Taxpayer Advocate Service office in Houston or Brooklyn. Calls may be ‘robo-calls’ that request a call back. Once the taxpayer returns the call, the con artist requests personal information, including Social Security number or individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN).

TAS can help protect your taxpayer rights. TAS can help if you need assistance resolving an IRS problem, if your problem is causing financial difficulty, or if you believe an IRS system or procedure isn’t working as it should. TAS does not initiate calls to taxpayers “out of the blue.” Typically, a taxpayer would contact TAS for help first, and only then would TAS reach out to the taxpayer.

10 Financial Documents You Should Never Throw Away

With spring cleaning season in full swing, you might be tempted to go Marie Kondo on your entire house, tossing out everything that doesn’t spark joy. Wait! While storing financial documents probably won’t ever bring you joy, not having them when you need them down the road will definitely spark anxiety—and could cause massive headaches when it comes to the IRS. The key is to know how to organize them properly and when you can safely shred them.

“Organizing your financial documents allows you to reduce your paperwork clutter and gain control of your financial life,” says Tony Steuer, an authority on financial literacy and author of GET READY! A Step-by-Step Planner for Maintaining Your Financial First-Aid Kit. “Being able to quickly find your important documents will help you during major life events, such as when you apply for a loan, meet with your estate planning attorney, or are forced to leave your house in an emergency.” It will also help your spouse, children, or executor in the event you become incapacitated or pass away.

How Much Do You Need to Earn to Max Out Your Social Security Benefit?

The maximum Social Security benefit for a new retiree in 2018 is north of $33,000 per year at full retirement age and can be even higher for workers who wait. So how much do you need to earn if you want the maximum Social Security benefit when you retire?

Unfortunately, this question is more complicated than it may seem. Here's a rundown of how much you can get from Social Security, how much you'll need to have earned to get the maximum benefit, and how the maximum benefit amount could change in the future.

3 Awful Reasons to Take Social Security Benefits at 62

Because Social Security eligibility kicks in at age 62, many seniors rush to claim benefits as early as possible. But there's a downside to filing at 62: reducing your benefits by taking them ahead of full retirement age (FRA).

For today's workers, FRA is either 66, 67, or 66 and a certain number of months -- it all depends on your year of birth. Either way, filing at 62 means taking benefits early and reducing them in the process.

What sort of reduction are we talking about? If you're looking at an FRA of 67, filing at 62 will slash your benefits by 30%. And unless you happen to undo your application in time, once you lock in that lower benefit, it'll remain in effect for the rest of your life.

Now there are certain circumstances under which claiming benefits at 62 makes sense. But these three reasons for filing early just don't.

If / Then Scenarios for Taxpayers Who Get Phished

The IRS reminds taxpayers that the agency does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email or text messages to request personal or financial information. This includes requests for PIN numbers, passwords or similar information for credit cards, banks and other financial accounts.

This is important for everyone to remember because thieves often pose as the IRS to get taxpayers to turn over personal information in a scam called phishing. Phishing is typically carried out through unsolicited emails or websites.

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